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why is my Access database read-only?

On Database » Microsoft Access

4,739 words with 4 Comments; publish: Fri, 06 Jun 2008 13:30:00 GMT; (25078.13, « »)

I built a database and then saved it out on our shared drive for others to

use. Why are others, when they go in, getting a message stating it's

read-only? I checked the file attributes and "Read Only" is not checked. I

didn't set up any security levels when I built this. What do you think is the

problem?

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  • 4 Comments
    • "Patti" <Patti.ms-access.todaysummary.com.discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message

      news:487248B9-6126-4087-B9BD-830583049016.ms-access.todaysummary.com.microsoft.com

      > I built a database and then saved it out on our shared drive for

      > others to use. Why are others, when they go in, getting a message

      > stating it's read-only? I checked the file attributes and "Read Only"

      > is not checked. I didn't set up any security levels when I built

      > this. What do you think is the problem?

      Do the users have full permissions -- including file-create

      and -delete -- on the server folder where the database is? They need

      those permissions so that Access can create and manage the

      record-locking (.ldb) file in that folder.

      Are all users going to be opening this same .mdb file directly from the

      server? That's not a good way to do it; it can work, but it's prone to

      corruption. Better is to split the database into a back-end .mdb file

      (containing only the tables) and a front-end file containing all other

      objects, with tables linked to those in the back-end. Then put the

      back-end on the server and a separate copy of the front-end on each

      user's PC.

      Dirk Goldgar, MS Access MVP

      www.datagnostics.com

      (please reply to the newsgroup)

      #1; Fri, 06 Jun 2008 13:32:00 GMT
    • Patti wrote:

      > I built a database and then saved it out on our shared drive for

      > others to use. Why are others, when they go in, getting a message

      > stating it's read-only? I checked the file attributes and "Read Only"

      > is not checked. I didn't set up any security levels when I built

      > this. What do you think is the problem?

      All users must have permisison on the *Folder* to ...

      Create New Files

      Modify Files

      Delete Files

      This is required for proper management of the LDB file that is created,

      modified, and destroyed as users come and go. If the first user is not

      allowed to create the LDB file then he opens the MDB exclusively and locks

      everyone else out. If an LDB is created by the fisrt user but a subsequent

      user is not allowed to modify it (inherited from the folder permissions)

      then he is only allowed read-only access.

      I don't check the Email account attached

      to this message. Send instead to...

      RBrandt at Hunter dot com

      #2; Fri, 06 Jun 2008 13:33:00 GMT
    • Thanks so much Dirk. As a novice in this, I really appreciate your help and

      will use your advice.

      "Dirk Goldgar" wrote:

      > "Patti" <Patti.ms-access.todaysummary.com.discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message

      > news:487248B9-6126-4087-B9BD-830583049016.ms-access.todaysummary.com.microsoft.com

      > Do the users have full permissions -- including file-create

      > and -delete -- on the server folder where the database is? They need

      > those permissions so that Access can create and manage the

      > record-locking (.ldb) file in that folder.

      > Are all users going to be opening this same .mdb file directly from the

      > server? That's not a good way to do it; it can work, but it's prone to

      > corruption. Better is to split the database into a back-end .mdb file

      > (containing only the tables) and a front-end file containing all other

      > objects, with tables linked to those in the back-end. Then put the

      > back-end on the server and a separate copy of the front-end on each

      > user's PC.

      > --

      > Dirk Goldgar, MS Access MVP

      > www.datagnostics.com

      > (please reply to the newsgroup)

      >

      >

      #3; Fri, 06 Jun 2008 13:34:00 GMT
    • "Patti" <Patti.ms-access.todaysummary.com.discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message

      news:D60F2F25-187A-4957-B61B-8EC935B557FD.ms-access.todaysummary.com.microsoft.com

      > Thanks so much Dirk. As a novice in this, I really appreciate your

      > help and will use your advice.

      I'm glad to help. If you're going to follow my advice and split your

      database, the information here will probably help you:

      http://www.granite.ab.ca/access/splitapp/index.htm

      Dirk Goldgar, MS Access MVP

      www.datagnostics.com

      (please reply to the newsgroup)

      #4; Fri, 06 Jun 2008 13:35:00 GMT